Slow Church

"Slow Church" is a good title for those who are weary of the "McDonaldization" of churches to emphasize too much on standardization, quick results, and a business-like approach to church.  While I like some of the authors' points (slow food movement spilling over to slow relationships and discipleship that are deeper over time, feeding the poor and engaging the local community more, etc.), I would have like liked to have seen more about how churches can help with other issues (pro-lifers helping take care of babies and mothers after the baby's birth, etc.).  As other reviewers have pointed out (and I think with some validity) the emphasis on some issues seem to make the authors of the Democrat Party mindset with little of Republican leanings (one of the authors readily admits to growing up a Republican and then switching parties and voting for Kerry and Obama).  In my humble opinion, the church needs to confront both parties when needed and to be careful of cozying up to either party.

 

Comment aside, I still think Slow Church has good points, some of which are:

 

1.  The problem of relying on efficiency, calculability, predictability, and control to measure church success.
2.  We will bear the most fruit when we stay rooted in a community.
3.  Slowing down and enjoying God's grace of life means we need to address the impatience that lies deep in our hearts.
4.  Questions to ask when we start to rely too much on labor and time saving devices.
5.  The good ends we are striving for cannot be separated from the means we use.
6.  Ways churches can help members and the community reclaim work for God's glory.
7.  3 important lessons God teaches us about the Sabbath.
8.  Christian hospitality accepts people as God's special creations.

 

While some may not agree with the authors' apparent political leanings, there are still good points to ponder.  Overall, a good read.  I was given a review copy by Intervarsity Press in exchange for a fair review. 

 

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